Wednesday, December 12, 2018

The DECKED Brand Product Story


Born in Idaho, made in the USA, DECKED innovates products that make working in and around vehicles more efficient, safer and easier. Our manufacturing partners help us produce the highest quality products on the market right from the heartland of America.

We started thinking about DECKED in 2011, and by 2014 we were shipping our first full bed-length drawer storage systems. With a relentless eye on product quality and customer satisfaction, we are driven by the needs of the working man and woman.

See more at https://decked.com/

Monday, December 10, 2018

The 2018 F-150: Effective Payload | F-150 | Ford


With best-in-class* payload you’ll be able to work smart with more effective payload. Just one of the many reasons the 2018 Ford F-150 doesn’t just raise the bar. It is the bar.

*Max payload on F-150 XL Regular Cab, 8’ box, 5.0L, 4X2, Heavy Duty Payload Pkg. and 18” Heavy Duty Wheels. Not shown. Class is Full-Size Pickups under 8,500 lbs. GVWR based on Ford segmentation.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Reading Master Mechanic HD Crane Bodies


Master Mechanic™ Series Crane Bodies come in a variety of sizes and configurations to meet your particular project requirements. Built to withstand your industry's toughest environment, models range from nine feet to 14 feet in body length, 60 inches to 120 inches in cab-to-axle chassis and up to 12,000-pound weight capacity.

These Master Mechanic utility bodies offer infinitely adjustable shelving that gives you control over your storage capabilities and a modular design that reduces long-term operating costs having to repair and replace components. The Master Mechanic Series is engineered with a minimum of two horizontal cross-members for a substructure that rivals the strength and stability of any other body on the market.

Thursday, December 6, 2018

You Shouldn't Need a Ladder to Get Your Ladder


Adrian Steel's new Drop-Down Ladder Rack can be operated by technicians 5'4" or taller. These new ladder racks are constructed of durable and corrosion-resistant aluminum and have innovative adjustment knobs that allow users to set up their ladder rack in seconds.

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Crane operator certification deadline

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A candidate maneuvers the test load through the NCCCO’s service truck crane operator practical exam in Houston in 2013.Photo: NCCCO

“I spoke to the directorate last week  [early October] and they are still confident they can get this final rule out before then,” Graham Brent said in a phone interview in mid October.

“I’ll only say they’ve been pretty confident before and they haven’t managed to meet the deadline,” Brent added.

In fact, the day before the previous deadline of Nov. 10, 2017, OSHA published a notice on the Federal Register that confirmed a long-anticipated extension.

The operator certification requirement was included in an update to OSHA standard for cranes and derricks in construction — called 29 CFR Part 1926 — published in 2010. Most of the provisions went into effect soon after, Brent said.

 Some exclusions apply

The proposed rule excludes cranes of 2,000 pounds capacity or less. “This standard applies to power-operated equipment, when used in construction, that can hoist, lower and horizontally move a suspended load,” the proposed regulations say. They specifically include “service/mechanic trucks with a hoisting device” but also exclude a “mechanic’s truck with a hoisting device when used in activities related to equipment maintenance and repair.”

Since service trucks are used primarily for repairing and maintaining equipment, the certification requirement usually doesn’t apply. However, Brent outlined a scenario where a service truck operator goes to a jobsite expecting to work on an engine and someone else on the site notices the crane and asks the operator to lift some pipe.

“Of course the guy is going to do that,” Brent said. “And that’s construction. So as an employer you want to be completely covered 100 percent of the time. And the way to do that is to have them certified.”

Another grey area is that service truck cranes are also used to hoist propane tanks. The wrinkle is that when a crane merely swaps an empty tank with a full one, that’s considered maintenance. But when a crane installs a propane tank for the first time, that’s regarded as construction.

Propane group seeks exemption
The National Propane Gas Association has called for OSHA to exempt truck-mounted crane delivering propane tanks from the regulations and asked for it to delay the Nov. 10, 2018 deadline. “This certification will cost the industry an estimated $151 million every five years,” said a posting on the association website.

The association even threatened to press the case to President Trump. “With the compliance deadline coming up in November, let’s tell The White House how much this rule impacts our industry so they will intervene with OSHA on our industry’s behalf.”

The NCCCO, in a July 5, 2018 letter to Loren Sweatt, the deputy assistant secretary of labor at OSHA, said it would “reluctantly support” another six month extension to the rule-making process. “We said, frankly, no because it’s taken us so long to get here that we think six months is probably not going to make a whole of difference,” Brent said.

He added that the delay “absolutely has maintained the risk because certification is a risk mitigator.” What’s driving the call for certification is the marketplace, he said, noting that 16 states already have their own crane operator certification requirements and that many job postings for crane operators require certifications.

“So if you’re a crane operator it’s in your own interest frankly to get certified,” Brent said.
The new rule will cover states and territories lacking crane certification requirements and create a “federal floor” that state regulations must meet at a minimum.

1,000 service truck certifications
About five years ago, the service truck industry formed a committee of manufacturers, dealers, users, trainers and others to work with the NCCCO to develop a certification for service truck crane operators. In its first year, the service truck program only certified about 75 operators. But the program has picked up steam and at last count had certified about 1,000 service truck operators, Brent said.

(Another certification body, Crane Institute Certification, has also launched a certification program for service truck crane operators.)

Since the last deadline extension on the regulations, OSHA has proposed removing a provision that required different levels of certification based on lifting capacity, although testing agencies can still do so. That’s a move the NCCCO supports.

OSHA also considered but declined to include an exemption for operators of cranes in the 5,000 to 35,000 pound capacity range. The NCCCO supports that move as well.

“What they said was the same risks are present regardless of the capacity,” Brent said, although he was at a loss to explain why that proposal didn’t also cover cranes from 2,000 to 5,000 pounds capacity.

One area where the NCCCO disagrees with OSHA is a proposal that trainers not be required to be certified operators.

In its response, the NCCCO said that “while certification may not be an appropriate ‘sole’ crit
erion or a sufficient indication of competence as a trainer, it should be regarded as an appropriately necessary condition of establishing such competence and ensuring a ‘baseline’ of knowledge and skills.”

Numbers hard to estimate
Brent said the NCCCO has currently certified about 100,000 crane operators, which he “conservatively” estimated is 80 percent of all the certified operators. But how many others are still to be certified, “frankly, nobody knows,” he said.

“We won’t really know before the whole thing shakes out,” he added. “It’s obviously more than 100,000. Is it 200,000? Probably not actually. We’ve been doing this for 23 years and we’ve been talking about it now as a federal rule for at least 15. We’ve had deadlines come and go but these deadlines have had the effect of focusing people’s attention and getting trained and certified. So we’ve had spurts along the way. I’ve got to think, though, we’re it’s only half way there.”

The rules themselves might even lead to companies having fewer crane operators because firms might decide to reduce the cost of certification and only assign specific people to operate the cranes and assign others who formerly did some crane operating to other duties. Indeed, he cited the example of an unnamed petrochemical company that he recalled doing just that.

“That’s why it’s completely impossible to estimate because as soon as you can get an accurate number right this minute, they will change or probably reduce as a result of the mandatory requirement coming in,” Brent said.
Keith Norbury

Source: Service Truck Magazine 

November 19, 2018

Sunday, December 2, 2018

VMAC - The Only Air Compressor Specifically Engineered for Commercial Vans

 UNDERHOOD for vans banner

When making purchasing decisions, we’re seeing that commercial van customers are considering TCO over the lifetime of their vehicle. They are prioritizing ease of up-fit and customization options, proven powertrain options, and strong dealer networks. One of the most frustrating up-fit items with commercial
 vans is the air compressor.
Until recently, fleets were limited to two options:
  • An electric drive air compressor that takes up too much valuable cargo space, is underpowered, and plainly just not suited for commercial work.
  • A gas drive reciprocating air compressor which takes up even more space, is heavy and is known to cause heat damage in the interior of vans. Further, these types of compressors cause safety issues due to exhaust fumes not being properly ventilated, and gas tanks being filled inside the cargo area.
Recently a new type of under the hood air compressor has been designed for these vans. Custom engineered for each engine and van by VMAC, these incredibly compact air compressors are easy to install and have the power to fill a 11R24.5 commercial truck tire in just over 3.5 minutes.

Learn more at:   https://www.vmacair.com/blog/choosing-air-compressor-commercial-van/