Sunday, September 15, 2019

Involve Your Techs With Spec'ing Work Trucks

 Store Long Items

Many business owners or fleet and equipment managers cringe when the time comes to purchase new work trucks. When you don’t work out of the vehicle that is being purchased, it can be a challenge to understand the daily application and requirements. Incorrectly “spec’ing” the vehicle translates into lost ROI, safety issues and unhappy techs.

Many companies choose one extreme or the other when it comes to input from the techs that actually use the vehicle. Either the techs get little to no input on the new work trucks or the company leaves it up to the techs entirely. The best approach, for both the company and techs, is to establish a collaborative process. One that values the perspective of the technicians while taking into account the position and direction of the company. Read on to discover how.
On the side of technicians...

The work truck is the mobile office of the technician. It can also serve as the shop, break area and more. Regardless if they are HVAC techs, plumbers, or electricians, they all depend on their work truck on a daily basis. With the next work truck purchase approaching, be sure to gather this information from the techs to ensure it is set up to be efficient and safe.

  •     Thoroughly understand what is stored on the vehicle. Are there a lot of hand tools that can be found quicker if a set of mechanics drawers are provided? Do they carry a lot of hardware or small parts that warrant parts bins. Does any larger equipment (think ladders) or materials (think pipes) eat up too much space in the bed? If the tech spends 15 minutes on every jobsite just trying to locate and retrieve what they need on the vehicle, it is time to increase organization which will lead to better efficiency.
  •     Are there repetitive motions being performed that put the tech at risk of injury while on the job? For instance, are they stepping up and down on a tall bumper or lifting heavy components or equipment in and out of the bed? Items like cable steps mounted to the bumper or collapsable cargo area cranes can alleviate these dangerous repetitive motions. Without asking, you may never uncover these issues.
  •     While creature comforts in the cab may seem like just convenience to you, for the tech they may make the difference between happy on the job and feeling appreciated or hating to go to work every day. These can be as small as power windows or as big as remote start.
  •     Last, but certainly not least, are safety and security. Is the tech having rear visibility issues when reversing on a jobsite or attempting to hook up to a trailer? Are their tools and equipment commonly stolen when working in high-theft areas? Investing in rear vision cameras and enhanced security options can make a huge difference in the safety and security of the work truck.
On the side of business owners and fleet/equipment managers…

While work trucks can be a major expense, business owners and fleet managers also realize work trucks are a major contributor to revenue. However, with all businesses there are budgets to maintain. No one understands the position of the company better than a business owner or fleet manager. Be sure to take the following items into account prior to the next work truck purchases.

  •     The jobs that are being done today may change dramatically a few years down the road, depending on the growth and direction of the company and the industry. Many companies will keep work trucks in service for a long period, some for 10 years or more. Keep this in mind as the work trucks may need to transition along with the business.
  •     Cost will always be a major limiting factor with work truck purchases. While the techs may want the Cadillac, that can’t always be the outcome. Maximize the value by creating the best work truck possible with the money that has been allocated.
  •     Maintenance costs can drain the ROI directly out of a work truck. Spec a work truck that has a solid reputation of reliability and performance. Sometimes, the best place to obtain this info is from other business owners or fleet managers.

Remember, take into account both sides of the coin in order to produce the best possible work truck.

Source:  https://www.knapheide.com/news/blog/2018/05/involve-your-techs-with-specing-work-trucks


Friday, September 13, 2019

Cummins History: 1931 Coast-to-Coast with Clessie Cummins



Determined to top a coast-to-coast record held by GM's gas engine, Clessie Cummins set out with a diesel-powered cargo truck on a route from New York City to Los Angeles in August 1931.

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

All-Electric F-150 Prototype

All-Electric F-150 Prototype

An all-electric Ford F-150 prototype during a capability test. The battery-powered truck successfully towed more than 1.25 million pounds of rail cars and trucks during the test.

Monday, September 9, 2019

7 Tips for Sharing the Road with Semi-trucks

Vehicles and semi-trucks driving on an interstate

Driving near large trucks

Did you know 75 percent of commercial vehicle accidents are caused by drivers in passenger cars? While actions like distracted driving certainly play a role in some of these cases, there are likely multiple occasions that happen simply because drivers don’t understand how to safely maneuver around large vehicles.
Though sharing the road with semis is a daily task, not all motorists understand the limitations of a semi — mainly wide turning radiuses, slow stopping times and large blind spots. To help educate the general public on safe driving techniques, the American Trucking Associations (ATA) started a highway safety program called Share the Road. Using some of the ATA tips and our own, we’ve compiled a list of driving habits that will help make the road a safer place.

Seven tips for motorists sharing roads with semis

Roadway safety is the responsibility of all drivers, but you can take certain steps to ensure you’re doing your part. When driving near or around a semi-truck, be sure to:
  1. Drive defensively
    Operating a vehicle probably comes second nature to you. But, no matter how comfortable or skilled you are behind the wheel, it’s important to remain alert at all times — especially around large trucks. Semis are bigger in size and weight, making them slower to react to avoid collisions. Pay attention to vehicle locations, traffic flow, vehicle signals and weather so you can anticipate problems and have plenty of time to safely change course if necessary.
     
  2. Keep a safe distance
    Driving close to a semi puts you at greater risk for being hurt by sudden stops, tire blowouts or roll overs caused by strong wind. So, whether you’re behind, in front or beside a large truck, leave plenty of space for merging, swerving and maneuvering. It’s best practice to keep at least a four-second following distance between you and the trailer in case of a sudden stop.
  1. Avoid blind spots
    The right side of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) is the largest blind spot for a truck driver — sometimes blocking their view for three or more lanes. Other areas of concern include directly in front of the cab, behind the trailer and certain zones along the driver’s side. Avoid spending time in these zones to ensure the driver can see you.
     
  2. Pass quickly
    Passenger vehicles typically travel faster than semis, so it’s not unusual to pass a lot of trucks along your route. Practice safe passing by driving closer to the shoulder rather than the truck, and speeding up instead of lingering.
     
  3. Don’t cut a large truck off
    Semis have much longer stopping distances — up to two football fields when traveling 65 mph. To prevent a rear-end collision, make sure you can see the entire front end of the truck before merging in front of it.
     
  4. Dim the bright lights
    When traveling near or past a semi, make sure your bright headlights are dimmed. Bright lights reflecting off large truck mirrors can cause two seconds or more of temporary blindness when traveling at 55 mph. The general rule of thumb is to lower your bright lights when you’re one block (or closer) behind a semi.
     
  5. Always signal
    As mentioned, trucks require more time to react to motorists stopping, turning or merging lanes. Because of this, it’s important to signal the driver at least three seconds or more before upcoming changes. This timing allows the truck driver to slow down or move over.

Saturday, September 7, 2019

FORD Trucks at the 2019 Work Truck Show


NTEA Work Truck Show, all new Ford F600, RV chassis, E-chassis and of course 2021 F650-750. Commercial trucks chassis cabs will all the safety features of a F150.

Source: MrTruckTV

Thursday, September 5, 2019

The Rugby Eliminator LP Dump Body - The Industry Leader in Class 3-5 bodies


The Eliminator LP Dump Body, by Rugby Manufacturing, is the industry leader in Class 3-5. Featuring a sleek, streamline style and designed for maximum durability, these units are available in 9' to 12' lengths with 12 and 17" side height options. Units come equipped with a sloped 1/4 cab shield that has a slotted viewing window. A lower mounting height improves the body’s overall stability. The patented EZ-LATCH™ system is also included for easy tailgate operation and maximum safety.

Other industry leading design features include:
  •     10 ga construction throughout on bodies with rigid sides, bodies with fold down sides have 12 ga sides
  •     Fully boxed and tapered dirt-shedding top rail
  •     Double-walled rigid sides with 6" vertical braces
  •     Single-walled fold down sides with 6" vertical braces
  •     Pockets for 6" side boards increase load capacity
  •     Side design includes fully boxed 45° dirt shedding top rail and a 50° sloped bottom rail for a completely self-cleaning profi le
  •     Front body's seamless one-piece design features triple bend top rails for long-term durability
  •     Stacked understructure consisting of 5" structural long members overlaid with 3" structural I-beam crossmembers spaced 16" (12" optional) apart
  •     1/4 cab shield with viewing window
  •     Full height corner posts with rear surface sloped 6° aids in tailgate closing
  •     Tailgate double walled panel design fabricated from 10 ga steel featuring fully boxed dirt-shedding top and bottom rails. Two vertical braces to provide additional strength and rigidity
Body Options
2-3 & 3-4 Yard Rigid & Fold Down Side Carbon Steel:
  •     Cabshields (1/4, 1/2, 3/4, Full) Standard and Tall
  •     7-gauge floor
  •     Cross sills on 12" centers
  •     Understructure Options: 
    • Stacked  
    • Crossmemberless
Aluminum Side Assemblies available on 3-4 yard Fold Down Side model

Standard Features
  •     Cab Shield Posts
  •     Full depth front pillars include easily locating cut-out for fast installation of cab shield insert. Makes all Eliminator LP cab shields interchangeable, helping to keep inventory low.
  •     Fold down sides feature a centrally located quick release lever that extends and retracts 3/4" pins at each end using a solid linkage member. Weight-saving aluminum fold down sides are optional on steel bodies.
  •     Low Mount Hoist
  •     The Eliminator LP's lower mounting height improves the body's overall stability. Actual mounting height 7 5/8".
  •     Rugby's patented and industry leading EZ-LATCH™ (located on each side of body) allows for easy body access. The latch system is designed for quick opening and slam lock operation with a cam action to draw-in upper tailgate pins.
Find Rugby Eliminator Accessories  and other products at:
 http://www.rugbymfg.com/light-dump-bodies/eliminator-lp.html


Tuesday, September 3, 2019

ENTREPRENEURS GOING MOBILE INSTEAD OF BRICK AND MORTAR, DRIVING BOOM IN AMERICA’S VAN BUSINESS


  • Ford is seeing an additional increase in sales of its Transit van – already America’s top seller – as small business owners rethink traditional models of operation with the rise of an on-demand economy
  • Transit has seen a 5.3 percent uptick in sales for fleets ranging in size from one to five vans; added connectivity, configuration options and available driver-assist features in the 2020 Transit will provide owner/operators even more reasons to go mobile
  • Businesses are adding on-site services or going exclusively mobile for the benefit of lower overhead costs and a more personalized experience
DEARBORN, Mich. August 29, 2019 – Steve McBride, executive director of Pewabic Pottery, knew the future success of this historic business couldn’t rely on foot traffic alone. To find new ways to engage with the community and increase awareness of its business, owners of the 116-year-old ceramic studio and school purchased a Ford Transit and created a traveling exhibition space with portable ceramic firing kilns that allows the artists to bring the Pewabic experience to community festivals and schools.

Sunday, September 1, 2019

Custom Designed Welders Bodies by Harbor Truck Bodies

Harbor can custom build a Welders Body 
for each customers unique needs







It seems that there's no such thing as a standard Welder Body because every welder want something different.Harbor can custom build a Welders Body for each customers unique needs.Here's a 9' Low Pro 34" Open Top Service Body with Stainless Steel lids and with slightly raised front compartments to the standard height of 40" closed compartment style.

This also has a small sized transverse compartment with two compartments for tall gas bottles in storage, while in the main front compartment are bottle brackets and rings for short gas bottles. This also has the rear compartment cut off and an 18" work platform with V-groove on the back plus the standard 8" step bumper.

Let Harbor create a unique body for you! Call 800-433-9452. www.htbi.net