Thursday, August 29, 2019

Understanding the Critical Role of the Utility in Fleet Electrification

Proper planning and engagement can aid in the smooth transition to fleet electrification.

Proper planning and engagement can aid in the smooth transition to fleet electrification.
Adding electric vehicles to your fleet is not as simple as selecting the vehicle you want and ordering it. Unlike diesel and gasoline powered vehicles, you can’t just pull into a truck stop and plug in your EV to recharge the battery. At least not yet.

But don’t let this scare you off from considering bringing electric vehicles into your operation. Proper planning will help you have a smooth transition to a hybrid or electrified fleet. Even if you’re not an expert on charging infrastructure or fleet electrification, there are resources at your disposal: a local utility can provide helpful guidance and it’s quite likely they already have experience assisting other fleets with electrification efforts.

Engage Your Utility First
When it comes to electricity, rates can fluctuate up to 200% in a given day depending on when and how quickly it’s used. To put things in perspective: imagine if the price of oil varies based on when and how fast you filled the tank. Think how difficult it would be to plan and budget properly.
The 3,300 electric utilities in the U.S. have varying tariffs structures, peak demand rates, time of use charges, etc.; all of which impact what you will be paying to charge your vehicles. Therefore, it is imperative that you work with your local utility and not rely on general information about needed electric charging infrastructure, rates, etc.

So before you even place an order for an electric vehicle, you first want to speak with your electric utility company. They can not only give you information on your current electrical , but can also tell you about special, local funding opportunities that might be available to defray costs. They can assist with everything from your substation to your transformer through to your meter.

Each case is unique and should be dealt with on an individual basis by working in tandem with partners and utility company staff.

Utility as Consultant
Fleet managers also need to determine exactly what their operational needs are going to be, and how charging will fit into this. How many EVs are you planning to add to the fleet? Will they all need to be fully charged at the end of each day? Will they all be charging at the same time of day or will they be returning to the yard at different times and therefore charging throughout the day?

Here again you can bring in a utility partner or specialist consultant to help you model multiple charging scenarios. They can also help you build out an infrastructure that is capable of handling additional charging stations in the future as you bring more EVs into your fleet. When it comes to retrofitting your facility, your energy provider can advise if electrical upgrades may be necessary to accommodate your specific needs.

Now is when you should start thinking about ongoing energy management. This is an area that is often overlooked, but failure to think through how to manage energy and avoid demand charges could result in costly surprises on your energy bills month after month.
Bring up the discussion on load management and best ways to fuel your electric fleet early. Only at this point should you begin constructing the infrastructure and installing the charging equipment.

Don’t Underestimate Planning
In its Guidance Report, Amping Up: Charging Infrastructure for Electric Trucks, The North American Council for Freight Efficiency found that, “Because of the nature of EV charging infrastructure, utilities will need to be involved in the planning and implementation processes as partners, and because they are subject to much regulation and government bureaucracy, it’s best to engage them early, as planning and permitting can take over a year.”

In addition, the report found, “Planning and permitting for charging infrastructure can be very time-intensive process.” This means you need to begin the process well before you take possession of your first electric vehicle. NACFE advises that “infrastructure planning, negotiating, funding, permitting, installation, and certification can take much longer than procuring the [vehicle] itself.”

While different from diesel and gasoline powered vehicles, there is no need to shy away from electric vehicles. With some careful, early planning you can seamlessly integrate them into your current operation.

Muffi Ghadiali is founder and CEO of Electriphi Inc., a developer of EV fleet and energy management solutions. Electriphi offers a planning tool to help fleets begin to electrify their fleets.

Source:  https://www.greenfleetmagazine.com/338418/understanding-the-critical-role-of-the-utility-in-fleet-electrification

 by Muffi Ghadiali Share with FacebookShare with TwitterShare with LinkedInShare by Email
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Originally posted on Fleet Forward

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

DECKED 101: (Almost) Everything You Need to Know about DECKED


This is a deep dive into DECKED pickup truck and cargo van storage systems : exploring what it does for the customer, how it's constructed, its features and benefits, as well as assembly/installation best practices. While this is intended for DECKED retailers this is also a helpful guide for interested customers as well.

Sunday, August 25, 2019

VMAC G30 Gas Driven Air Compressor at work - Powered by Honda


Get all the power you need in this small air compressor. The G30 gas drive air compressor with 30 CFM rotary screw air power. Powered by Honda

Friday, August 23, 2019

How to load and unload the Kargo Master 4A92L EZ Dropdown Ladder Rack


Kargo Master makes it easy to load and unload your ladder racks. The 4A92L features aluminum design and ergonomic loading to make it easy to grab your ladder and go!

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Pickup Vault - A.R.E. Truck Caps and Tonneau Covers


To learn more about the Pickup Vault, and other accessories offered by A.R.E.,
 please visit their website at www.4are.com.

Monday, August 19, 2019

VMAC's UNDERHOOD70-G System Customer Testimonial


After using the amazing UNDERHOOD70-G air compressor on his high-demand roofing jobs, Dale Clozza of Aurora Roofing in Nanaimo, BC, had a lot to say about the efficiency, fuel savings and compact power of one of VMAC's newest, innovative air compressor system - including its ability to TURN HIS TRUCK ON AND OFF as his air tools need air. Learn More: http://vmacair.com/product/underhood-...

Saturday, August 17, 2019

Switch-N-Go™: S-Model




Switch-N-Go’s™ S-Model system is designed to work on medium duty work trucks with room for little or no overhang. Equipping your truck with a Switch-N-Go™ S-Model your truck has all the benefits of the Switch-N-Go™ system with the bonus of no frame overhang which allows for easier towing.

Available in 9’, 10’ and 11’ versions the S-Model has all of the features of the Original Switch-N-Go™ body changing system, plus the added benefit of no frame overhang.

The S-Model is designed to run with electronically powered hydraulics.  This saves you the expense of adding a power take-off and pump to your automatic transmission.  The system is offered with 12,000 or 15,000 pound pull capacity winches.  The Switch-N-Go™ system has all of the benefits of a dump body as the scissor hoist will achieve a 50-degree dump angle, which is perfect for dumping mulch, asphalt, compacted soil, and more, dumping upwards of 10 tons.  The system is designed for trucks with a GVWR of 13,000 – 26,000 lbs.

Are you a new owner of a Switch-N-Go™ system or do you have a new employee to train on how to use the Switch-N-Go™ system?  If so, check out the How to use the Switch-N-Go™ system video on YouTube.

Additionally, if you have recently purchased a Switch-N-Go™ system or do you have a new employee we recommend that you watch the following instructional videos:

 - Lubing the wire rope

 - Checking the electrical connections

 - Warn winch connections

 - Greasing your Switch-N-Go

 - Using the wire rope

 - Tighten the side rollers

 - Using the body locks


Find out more at: http://www.switchngo.com


Thursday, August 15, 2019

Knapheide EC Series Service Body Walk Around




Watch Mike Soich, Regional Sales Manager, point out the industry-leading features found on Knapheide EC Series Service Bodies. See more about Knapheide products at www.knapheide.com

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Sunday, August 11, 2019

Quick Guide To Industry Acronyms

 Quick Guide To Industry Acronyms


Understanding the many industry acronyms and terms can be overwhelming. This quick guide can get you up to speed on some of the most important terms and meanings.

GVW – Gross Vehicle Weight
This is the total weight of the truck, including all passengers, drivers, cargo, accessories, fuel, and fluid in the engine at any point in time. It is important that this measurement does not go over the GVWR, or it can be a safety hazard.

GVWR – Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
This is the maximum total vehicle weight that is safe for the truck, established by the chassis manufacturer. The weight of the truck, any cargo, and passengers including the driver, as well as any fuel and fluid in the engine is included in the rating. Chassis manufacturers will most often set the GVWR lower than the combined axle ratings (the total amount of weight an individual axle can carry). This is due to the chassis manufacturer’s internal safety standards for durability, stability, and handling, as well as SAE International test protocols.

GCWR – Gross Combined Weight Rating
Everything that moves with the vehicle is included in the GCWR. The weight of the truck, any cargo, passengers including the driver, any fluid or fuel in the truck, as well as the weight of the trailer and the trailer’s cargo is included. Exceeding the GCWR can cause a safety hazard.

Payload
The cargo carrying capacity of a vehicle is the payload. It is calculated by subtracting the vehicles’ weight including passengers and the driver from the GVWR. Exceeding the Payload capacity can cause damage to your suspension, chassis, frame, tires, and many other parts of the truck.

CA – Cab to Axle
The cab-to-axle measurement is the distance from the back of the truck cab to the center of the rear axle. Clear CA or effective CA is the distance from the rear surface of any obstruction behind the cab to the center of the rear axle. If you have a tandem axle truck, then it is measured to the midpoint between the two rear axles. This measurement can help you determine the length of the body that can be mounted on the chassis.

Wheelbase
The wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear axles. When the truck has more than two axels, it is the distance between the steering axle and the center point of the driving axle group. This can affect body installation, weight distribution, and truck performance.

SRW – Single Rear Wheel
A single rear wheel refers to a chassis that has one wheel on each side of the rear axle. Single Rear wheels make for smoother driving without cargo, as well as easier driving in cities, suburbs, and highways. These trucks are more affordable to purchase outright, and have better fuel economy. A single rear wheel has less towing capability than a dual rear wheel, and less stability when towing in windy conditions.

DRW – Dual Rear Wheel
A dual rear wheel refers to a chassis that has two wheels on each side of the rear axle. This feature is a must if you are towing large payloads, or driving through rough terrain. It adds stability to your truck which increases safety for your divers and cargo. Having a dual rear wheel will allow the driver to safely get off the road in the case of a tire blowing out. Trucks with a dual rear wheel can be difficult to maneuver in cities, where parking and tight streets can be challenging. This feature can also reduce the truck’s mpg, especially in cities, and increase maintenance costs, because there are at least two extra tires to replace or rotate.

CDL – Commercial Driver’s License
The vehicle’s GVWR is one of the factors that will effect whether the diver needs a CDL. If the truck has a GVWR, and GVW of 26,000 lbs. or lower, the driver does not need a CDL.

Class A
A Class A license is required to operate any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 lbs. or more. This includes towing a trailer weighing over 10,000 lbs. which makes the vehicle and trailer rating over 26,001 lbs.

Class B
A Class B license is required to operate a single vehicle with a GVWR or 26,001 lbs. or more, and/or a vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 lbs. or heavier that is towing another vehicle weighting up to 10,000 lbs.

Class C
A Class C license is required if the vehicle you intend to drive does not meet the criteria for either Class A or B and it is meant to transport either: 16 or more passengers including the driver or hazardous material.

Original Source: NTEA Truck Equipment Glossary


Blog Source: https://www.knapheide.com/news/blog/2018/08/quick-guide-to-industry-acronyms

Friday, August 9, 2019

TRANSFER FLOW - INCREASE YOUR CAPACITY FOR FUEL AND PROFITS!


A Transfer Flow fuel tank installed on your work truck allows you to spend less time at the fuel pump and more time on the job. Increased capacity gives you the option to shop for the best fuel prices, and save money by purchasing more fuel at one time.


With almost 35 years of engineering and manufacturing fuel tank systems, some of the biggest and best companies trust Transfer Flow for their fuel system needs. To increase the driving range on one vehicle or a fleet of vehicles, we have the manufacturing capabilities and product diversity to help you grow your business.

Increase your capacity for fuel and profits by contacting us at 800-826-5776 or visit our website at transferflow.com.

Transfer Flow – we fuel YOUR success!

Monday, August 5, 2019

HARBOR WORKMASTER - Working for Your Protection...




The WorkMaster secures the tools of your trade unlike any other enclosed service body. Constructed with steel, built like a vault, the “walk-in” WorkMaster is designed for heavier-duty cutaway vans…and we have been known to mount them on a chassis or two. The WorkMaster is constructed in different lengths and heights to meet your every tool, material storage, and interior height (up to 6’3″) requirement. Need to carry more than your typical van? This is your truck!
  • Tightest security system in town, featuring double-bit keys and a Master Lock internal locking system
  • Modern gas shocks on each side opening door to keep them open during loading and unloading
  • Rear side access door for storage of conduit or other long (10-ft.) materials
  • 12" step bumper and side-wall grab handles for ease of entrance into the bed
  • Interior ladder storage on hooks mounted along inside shelf
  • Weights up to 300 lbs. lighter than competing brands using FRP
  • Weather shield system around locks, doors, and hingles, preventing leaks and securing the tools of your trade. Neoprene door seals, water-proof gaskets, self-sealing stainless steel rivets, and silky smooth three-point door latches with Teflon glides.
Learn more at:
http://htbi.net/

Saturday, August 3, 2019

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Mechanics Trucks // Knapheide


Utilized for many vocations, the Knapheide Mechanics Truck line is sure to provide you with the solution you need – no matter what your job may be. (Featuring our KMS16 and KMT1 Mechanics Truck bodies)